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4 Children’s Books to Read with Your Child to Honor Hispanic Heritage Month

As we celebrate Hispanic Heritage Month (September 15th and October 15th of each year), we wanted to share a few of our favorite books about the Hispanic and Latinx community. By reading books and engaging in meaningful conversations, you can help your child see the many contributions Hispanics and Latinos have made to the culture of the United States.

Here are four books to read with your infant, toddler, preschooler, and school-ager to celebrate Hispanic Heritage Month!

 

Mango, Abuela, and Me by Meg Medina, illustrated by Angela Dominguez

This book tells the story of Mia and her Abuela (grandmother). Mia is excited that her grandmother, who lives far away, is visiting. Mia and her grandmother form a close bond and learn to communicate with one another despite not speaking the same language. You and your child will enjoy learning Spanish words as you read this heartwarming story.

 

 

 

Alma and How She Got Her Name by Juana Martinez-Neal

Alma has six names! — Alma Sofia Esperanza José Pura Candela. She thinks that is too many names, but then her father explains how her name connects her to her family and heritage.

Your family will enjoy this touching story of a young girl learning about her family history.

 

 

Counting With – Contando Con Frida by Patty Rodriguez and Ariana Stein

You and your child will enjoy counting in English and Spanish while learning about Mexico’s iconic painter, Frida Kahlo.

 

 

 

 

Planting Stories: The Life Of Librarian And Storyteller Pura Belpré by Anika Aldamuy Denise and Paola Escobar

Your family will enjoy this inspirational picture book about New York City’s first Puerto Rican librarian, who championed bilingual literature. Her legacy is still evident today.

 

 

 

 

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